Rag & Bone Puppet Theatre

Snippets of Canada

Here’s the flexible lineup for Snippets of Canada 150. We add and subtract depending on the library, the guest reader, and the audience response.

  • Russell sings a song.

Kathy: Hello everyone and welcome to Snippets of Canada 150, a collection of songs and stories celebrating Canada’s 150th birthday.

APA_2017-07-06_07-26-11_APA_4356We are Rag and Bone Puppet Theatre: Kathy, John, Russell and guests.

We want to thank all the librarians across Ottawa who suggested books and songs for this event. There were lots of ideas for books about animals.

In the end, we decided that we should start off with a book about a moose. A big moose, because Canada is so big. And moose live all across it.

  • Guest: Ernest by Catherine Rayner.
  • Russell sings a song.

Kathy: And now, a book about a bear and other animals.

  • Guest: I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen

Kathy: The First Nations were the first people in Canada, and one of our favourite Rag & Bone shows is A Promise is A Promise. And this is how that story begins.

  • Guest: A Promise is a Promise by Robert Munsch and Michael Kusugak

Kathy: Some of the first newcomers to Canada came from France, and here’s a song they sang.

  • Song: Ah! Si Mon Moine Voulait Danser

Kathy: And here’s a story about some French-Canadian trappers, from a book called The Talking Cat by Natalie Savage Carlson. It’s one story in a show we do called The Flying Canoe.

  • John, Kathy & Russell: The Bear in the Canoe

Kathy: Jean Marc and René were also loggers.

  • Russell sings a song.

APA_2017-07-06_07-06-48_APA_4268Kathy: Then there were farmers and settlers, and there are always new people coming to Canada, and this next story is from another Rag & Bone show called Felicity Falls. It’s about learning to get along and work together to build a great place to live, like Canada.

  • John & Kathy: Felicity Falls

Kathy: And here’s a song that celebrates farming, and one of our most famous vegetables.

  • Russell sings a song

Kathy: We’ve celebrated Canada’s animals, people and vegetables, but what about our birds? We have lots of birds in Canada. They all have different personalities. The next story is about one that is Grumpy.

  • Guest: Grumpy Bird by Jeremy Tankard
  • Russell sings a song.

APA_2017-07-06_07-33-51_APA_4377

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Rag & Bone Puppet Theatre

OCCASIONAL NOTES FROM RAG & BONE PUPPET THEATRE

Here’s the outline of the drama workshop we’ve been conducting with children as part of Snippets:
“Drama is pretending, acting things out, using your imagination to show things to
an audience.”

Warm-up
To get our bodies, our voices and our imaginations ready to go. The children repeat this magic poem:
Ish ka bibble bobble boo
Close your eyes I’ll magic you
There is nothing you can’t do!

Now children open their eyes and magic themselves into trees—the tallest trees in Canada, stretching up to the sky, bending a little in the breeze and now shrinking—becoming smaller trees, then seeds, then porcupines, icebergs, etc.

Ish ka bibble bobble bee
I look down and I can see
Now I’m magicked back to me.

Soldier Doll or Rag doll
The whole body is stiff and tall and still like a soldier. Then one part at a time becomes like a rag doll: floppy head, one floppy arm, then the other arm, one floppy leg, then the other leg. Add sound effects—a resonant hum to head rotations, rotations from the waist, rotations from the hips.

Tongue twisters
Red leather, yellow leather.
Toy boat, toy boat.
Rubber baby buggy bumpers, etc.

Snowball
Now our bodies and our voices are warmed up, let’s try some poems. Say one line at a time, with actions. The children repeat each line and action. Then try saying the poem again, this time like a tiny mouse or a giant ogre.
I made myself a snowball as round as it could be
I thought, I’ll keep this as a pet and let it sleep with me
I sewed it some pyjamas and a pillow for its head
But late last night it ran away
And first it wet the bed.
(Shel Silverstein)

Nursery rhyme mimes
Brainstorm the titles of as many nursery rhymes the children can think of Mime a nursery rhyme and let the children guess which one it was. Now divide them into groups of three or four and let each group go off to plan how they can act out a nursery rhyme with no words but in a way that the rest of the group can guess which one they’re doing.
Each group acts their rhyme silently, and the rest of the group guesses what it was. Then the group repeats their mime, only this time, the rest of the class says the words.

Machines
When you make a machine in drama, every person in the group has to have an action and a sound that repeat. The people making the machine have to somehow be connected. We don’t show people using the machine, just the machine going on and on all by itself. No video games, TV’s or computers. It should be a normal machine that we’ve all heard of so that we can guess what it is: something at home, at school, at a construction site, etc.

We demonstrate a machine to the group. Then the groups go off and plan their machines. Popular machines are: a blender, a washing machine, a car wash, a vacuum cleaner, a sprinkler, a front-end loader, or a wrecking ball. The groups presents their actions and. Then the rest guess, and the group repeats their machine now that everyone else knows what they’re doing.

The Little Red Hen
Kathy is the storyteller and John is the little red hen. The kids are the baby chicks, who say, “cheep cheep!” and they also play cats, ducks or pigs. Divide the children into three groups and tell them their lines:

Cats: Not us, we’re cleaning our fur.
Ducks: Not us, we’re splashing in the water.
Pigs: Not us, we’re rolling in the mud.

Narrator: Once upon a time, there was a little red hen who lived with her baby chicks, who said:

Baby Chicks: Cheep cheep

Narrator: One day, she was pecking in the barnyard and she found some grains of wheat. She decided to plant the wheat but she needed some help, so she asked the cats to help her.

Little Red Hen: Will you help me plant my wheat?

Narrator: And the cats said:

Cats: Not us, we’re cleaning our fur.

Narrator: And the ducks said:

Ducks: Not us, we’re splashing in the water

Narrator: And the pigs said:

Pigs: Not us, we’re rolling in the mud.

Little Red Hen: Fine, my baby chicks and I will do it ourselves.

Narrator: And the chicks said:

Baby Chicks: Cheep cheep

Narrator: (Encouraging everyone to do the actions) So the little chicks dug a hole in the ground, put the seeds in and covered them with earth. Then they watered them, and the grains of wheat grew and grew until they were tall and golden and swaying in the breeze.

Little Red Hen: Now it’s time to cut the wheat. Who will help me cut the wheat?

Narrator: And the cats said:

Cats: Not us, we’re cleaning our fur.

Narrator: And the ducks said:

Ducks: Not us, we’re splashing in the water

Narrator: And the pigs said:

Pigs: Not us, we’re rolling in the mud

Little Red Hen: Fine, my baby chicks and I will do it ourselves.

Narrator: And the chicks said:

Baby Chicks: Cheep cheep

Narrator: (With actions) So the little red hen and the baby chicks took a scythe, which is like a long sword, and they cut the wheat and bundled it up and took it to the miller and he ground it into flour. And when they had some flour, they could make bread.

Little Red Hen: Now it’s time to cut the wheat. Who will help me bake the bread?

Narrator: And the ducks said:

Ducks: Not us, we’re splashing in the water

Narrator: And the pigs said:

Pigs: Not us, we’re rolling in the mud.

Little Red Hen: Fine, my baby chicks and I will do it ourselves.

Narrator: And the chicks said:

Baby Chicks: Cheep cheep. 

So they put the flour in the mixing bowl with milk and salt and yeast and a bit of sugar and mixed it in the mixing bowl. Then they took the mixture out and kneaded it (etc.) and put it in the oven to cook. And as it cooked it smelled delicious. Then it was done. They put on oven mitts and took it out of the oven and it smelled wonderful.

Little Red Hen: Now, who will help me eat the bread?

Cats: We will!

Ducks: We will!

Pigs: We will!

Little Red Hen: You wouldn’t help me plant the seeds, you wouldn’t help me cut
the wheat, you wouldn’t help me make the bread, so now, my baby chicks and I
are going to eat it all by ourselves.

Narrator: And the chicks said:

Baby Chicks: Cheep cheep.